Stories from my travels around the world

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Stockholm area , Sweden

Hagaparken

Butterfly in my garden
Butterfly in my garden

.... continued

Haga Park is located outside the north tollgate of Stockholm and was bought by Gustav III in 1771. Beside the obvious beautiful park landscape of the park you can also see and visit some interesting places. I made a little map for you where you can easily locate the places I will be talking about on this page.

The butterfly garden is 800 square metres in size and has a tropical environment, which means very moist and warm. At any given time there will be about 400 butterflies flying freely around of numerous different species. The butterflies are exotic for Europe, but are quite common in their natural environments. In the photo you can see a not so exotic butterfly, hahaha, but one that is very common in my backgarden and this particular one was kind enough to sit still for a little while, so Åke could take a photo of it.

Besides the butterfly garden you can also visit the Asian Garden (which is closed during the winter).

Opening hours:
April-September: tue-fri 10:00-16:00; sat & sun 11:00-17:30
October-March: tue-fri 10:00-15:00; sat & sun 11:00-16:00

Entrance fee:
Adults: 70:sek
Students: 60:sek
Children 4 - 15 years: 30:sek

http://www.fjarilshuset.se

Prins Gustaf's Monument

Prins Gustaf's MonumentPrins Gustaf's Monument

A short stroll from the Butterfly house and the Kopper Tents I came across the Monument of Prins Gustaf. The monument is placed on top of a little hill close to the waters of "Brunnsviken" hidden under some trees. The monument of Prins Gustaf was placed here in 1854.

The butterfly garden is 800 square metres in size and has a tropical environment, which means very moist and warm. At any given time there will be about 400 butterflies flying freely around of numerous different species. The butterflies are exotic for Europe, but are quite common in their natural environments. In the photo you can see a not so exotic butterfly, hahaha, but one that is very common in my backgarden and this particular one was kind enough to sit still for a little while, so Åke could take a photo of it.

Prins Gustaf was son of King OscarI and Josepfina and part of the Bernadotte dynasty. He died when he was 25 years old (1827-1852) and lived for his music. That's why he is also known as the "Sångarprinsen" (Singing prins). The monument to the prins is quite charming and certainly worth the little climb up the hill to take a closer look.

Haga Slott

Haga Slott
Haga Slott

I followed the waterside for a little while and started to see a few more people in the park, jogging, walking, and all enjoying the park in their own way. And in the distance I could see Haga Slott or also called the "Queen's Pavilion".

The "Queen's Pavilion" was built in 1802-1804 by Gustav IV Adolf, and has been used as a royal residence during several periods. The house was designed by Christoffer Gjörwell and is in Italian Villa style. For me the house didn't look that impressive, but it is nicely surrounded by some beautiful autumn coloured trees, giving it some charm. Today Haga Slott is used by the Swedish government as an accommodation for prestigious guests.

Gustav III's Pavilion

Gustav III's Pavilion
Gustav III's Pavilion

Just a stone's throw away from Haga Slott is the "Gustav III's Pavilion". This Pavilion is said to be one of the highlights of Swedish art history and is one of the finest examples of the European Neo-Classicism of the late 1700s in Northern Europe. And I wanted soooo much to take a look inside. But unfortunately it was closed. The interiors of the Gustav III Pavilion can only be viewed during the summer months when the pavilion is open for guided tours. So I guess I just have to come back some day :-)

Gustav III's Pavilion was furnished after a trip that the king made to Italy and many of the original furnishings are still here. Especially the The "Spegelsalen" or Hall of Mirrors is particularly worth seeing. The Pavilion was designed by architect Olof Tempelman and decorated by Louis Masreliez in Pompeiian style.

Opening hours
June-Aug: Tues-Sun, only with guided tours 12:00, 13:00, 14:00 and 15:00.

Entrance fee
Adults: SEK 60
Children 7-18: SEK 25
Under 7 years: free entrance
Students: SEK 25

Ekotemplet / the Temple of the Echo

Ekotemplet / the Temple of the Echo
Ekotemplet / the Temple of the Echo

I think this was one of the favourite places in the park during my visit: The Ekotemplet (the Temple of the Echo). Hahaha, it also might have helped that is just started to rain lots more and this was the excellent place to take some cover. The views from the Ekotemplet are lovely, but so is the structure itself.

Ekotemplet was built in the 1790s as Gustav III's summer dining hall. The Temple has an oval shape and has 12 pillars, which hold up the copper roof. The roof is constructed in a very special way making it possible to overhear everything that is said inside it. So not the best place to start whispering secrets during one of the royal gatherings and parties of that time! I didn't notice any of the special acoustics of the temple as I was here all by myself, hahaha, so it was very quiet inside, but I did enjoy the views through the 12 pillars. The pillars, shape like arches, just framed the park landscape in a wonderful way, creating some beautiful views, as you can see in the photo. The Temple itself just fits in perfectly in the landscape, positioned on top of a little hill, surrounded by trees.

Ekotemplet
Ekotemplet / the Temple of the Echo

Chinese Pavilion

Maybe one of the more disappointing places for me was the Chinese Pavilion. I was looking so much forward to see this structure and imagined these bright colours against a nice blue sky.... instead it was raindrops falling from the sky. The Chinese Pavilion is located on the south-eastern part of the park, close to the Royal Graveyard and on top of a steep hill. There isn't much there and the views aren't as great either compared to the other places. The colours are still striking of the pavilion and I can imagine taking some nice photos on a sunny day. But on a dull day like this it is no real use to climb all the way up here.

The Chinese Pavilion, or "Kinesiksa pagoden" in Swedish, was designed by Desprez in 1787. There was a strong interest in everything Chinese in the late 18th century in Sweden, so it was quite logical for those times to include a Chinese Pavilion in the design of the park.

Chinese Pavilion

Chinese Pavilion
Chinese Pavilion

Read more on page 3 about Haga Park....